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History

Prentice G. Downes, intellectual and adventurer, was in love with the romance of the 'Old North.' His passion for the place very nearly got him killed. Photo courtesy McGahern Stewart Publishing
The inland sea of Nu-thel-tin-tu-eh had long been a place of legend. One man was dying to find it.
March 2013
Once the herd was spotted, the men would make wolf sounds to scare the caribou into the corral. Women and children would line the fence to keep the caribou headed towards the ambush point, where a team of men would be ready with spears and arrows to slaughter them. Illustration by Beth Covvey
How an ingenious hunting practice let the Tłįchǫ survive in the harsh North
February 2016
War and peace along the Peel River
January 2016
Helen Klaben was near death when she was rescued in 1963. She and Ralph Flores had survived a plane crash and six hungry, cold weeks in the bush. Courtesy Charles Hamilton
Fifty years ago, a pilot spotted an arrow stamped into the snow near the B.C.-Yukon border. He had no idea where it would lead.
January 2013
Long before the U.S. temperance movement put a cork in Klondike liquor, Yukoners loved their 'hooch.' Here, Dawson ladies hold a 'drinking bee' in 1900. Joseph Duclos/Dawson City Museum
In the tipsy Yukon, prohibition was a buzzkill. Would bush planes full of liquor quench their thirst?
December 2012
Bringing out the dead: hauling bodies by sled from the summit of the pass, April 3, 1898. Yukon Archives, Anton Vogee Fonds, #71
They'd already risked it all to get this far. The red flags of an avalanche wouldn't stop them.
January 2014
In a drawing by explorer George Back, a band of British adventurers bunk down in the wintery north woods. Institute for Northern Studies Fonds, University of Saskatchewan Archives
During a grim yuletide on Great Slave Lake, a team of starving explorers yearn for the gift of survival
December 2013
Jacey Firth-Hagen's #SpeakGwichinToMe campaign has garnered social media attention and re-energized the preservation of Gwich’in. Photo by Hannah Eden/Up Here
For helping promote the vulnerable Gwich’in language, Jacey Firth-Hagen has made our shortlist.
December 2015
In the North, they call themselves Dene. In the American Southwest, Diné. Same blood, same language – a continent apart. For years, no one could explain it. Now, clue by clue, the mystery is being solved.
August 2008
Archeologists excavate one of the houses at Kuukpak, located along the Mackenzie River, earlier this year. Photo courtesy of Max Friesen
For four centuries, Kuukpak, located in the Western Arctic along the Mackenzie River, was the richest, busiest summer settlement around
November 2015