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August/September 2016

Fly through nearly 100 years of aviation in Canada’s North. Our special Aviation Issue chronicles pioneering pilots in rickety bush planes in the 1920s, through the post-WWII heyday that saw the Arctic wilds open up to robust de Havilland bush planes, all the way to the airlines and jets of the present day. We interview Northern flying legends like Max Ward, Joe McBryan, and Fred Carmichael. Plus: Tim Edwards takes us through some of the ongoing mystery crashes of the North, and Katie Weaver profiles aviation-inspired art. And, in honour of the Queen’s birthday, we showcase her four visits to Canada’s North. 

In This Issue

Illustration by Beth Covvey

Running out of aces

Mike Murphy’s harrowing flight during Yellowknife’s smoke-pocalypse

By Katie Weaver
Sep 21
2016
Chris Hadfield speaks in Budapest in May 2016—the celebrated astronaut was at one time a CF-18 pilot, testing the boundaries of the Canadian Arctic. Photo by Elekes Andor

WEB EXTRA: Intercepting The Bear

Giving foreign borders a buzz was a routine practice of former CF-18 pilot, turned rock start astronaut Chris Hadfield

By Herb Mathisen
Sep 20
2016
An airship hanger in Svalbard, Norway. Photo - Public Domain

Airship Lost

Six balloon-men disappear into the Arctic air, never to be found again

By Daniel Campbell
Sep 19
2016

Iqaluit's Airbase Origins

How the United States military founded Nunavut’s capital

By Daniel Campbell
Sep 15
2016
Wop May during the hunt for the Mad Trapper, in 1932. Public Domain

Wop May’s Place In History

From the Red Baron to the Mad Trapper

By Tim Edwards
Sep 14
2016

Traffic On The 69th

Playing Santa on the Distant Early Warning Line

By Katie Weaver
Sep 13
2016
Fred Carmichael's flying career has spanned seven decades. Photo courtesy Fred Carmichael

From The Trapline To The Skies

How the North's first aboriginal pilot got his wings

By Daniel Campbell
Sep 12
2016
Roald Amundsen. Photo - Preus Museum/Paul Berge

Success In Failure

How the North’s greatest explorer escaped death at the pole

By
Sep 09
2016
Lost? Never. Punch Dickins would just land, make a cup of tea and get his bearings. NWT Archives/Wop May Fonds/N-1992-213: 0188

Pioneer Punch Dickins

This WWII ace would become a man of many firsts

By Tim Edwards
Sep 08
2016
The world’s most famous pilot flies into the North. Photo - Library and Archives Canada

Lindbergh Comes North

Charles and his wife fly circles around the North

By Francis Tessier-Burns
Sep 07
2016