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June Issue

The midnight sun takes over the June issue of Up Here magazine, and the land and waters we write about.

We’ve got solstice celebrations and a look at just what 24 hours of sunlight does to people, plants and animals.

We also travel out to Marble Island, near Rankin Inlet, where a legendary curse lives up to its hype. And from the photography department, we bring you a feature from inside a taxidermist’s shop in Yellowknife.

 

 

Previous Issues

Bring your appetite as we explore all the ways we eat: from raw whale blubber in Nunavut, to raw oysters in downtown Whitehorse. Flip through our Food & Drink guide, showcasing the best craft beer, barbecue and fish and chips the North has to offer. Plus, learn about how you can live off the land north of 60 with our Wild Diet feature. Herb Mathisen writes that we can indeed have agriculture in the Arctic, and it may even be better than the current model of shipping food North. Finally, try your hand at some of the best bannock recipes in the North. 

In this issue we look outside our borders, to the Northern nations and states that share our latitude. From Russia to Norway, Greenland, Iceland, Alaska, Sweden and Finland, Up Here finds out what these places are doing right, and what Canada can learn from them. Plus: Tim Edwards points out the upside to WWII in the Yukon, Daniel Campbell sees how Canada’s North compares in the Arctic tourism game, and Samia Madwar chats with Greenland’s first female prime minister about Canadian and Greenlandic Inuit. Also: a somewhat absurd tale of Canadian tanks driving across the Arctic is told.

One thing the North has in abundance is water. In this issue, we explore the ways Northerners use this precious resource: from canoeing, kayaking and even stand-up paddleboarding, to fishing and hydroelectric power. Daniel Campbell chats with Tuktoyaktuk's mayor about his efforts to revive the Mackenzie Delta qajaq, Tim Edwards journeys down the NWT’s Emile River, and Chesterfield Inlet’s Peter Autut waxes appreciation for frozen water. Plus: we check the pulse of the apparently-doomed fishing lodge industry, see how Niagara Falls stacks up against Virginia Falls, and detail every paddling river you never heard of in our definitive paddling guide. 

In our Great Northern Sports Issue, we go back more than 100 years to find whalers on a remote Beaufort Sea outpost playing a unique version of baseball, dive into ice-cold Yukon River water, and break a sweat with our definitive Northern workout guide. Also: we look back on the hockey teams of Yellowknife’s gold mines of yore, break down the rules of Inuit baseball, and dissect the science of Northern sports. Also included: an interview with Darryl Tait, the Yukoner who continues to impress the world with his stunts—despite being paralyzed from the chest down.   

Sit down with Canada’s leading polar bear scientist, Ian Stirling, as he dishes on the likely decline of our iconic animal. Then, dive into our “How-to” guide and learn to prepare for some unorthodox situations you might only encounter in the North; Tim Edwards gathers stories of savvy Northerners who got trapped out on the land in “How I got home”; Samia Madwar takes a deeper look at the places many believe to be in the middle of nowhere, and an old Dene caribou hunting technique is brought to light. 

In our first issue of 2016, we welcome Nick Sibbeston into our new “Icebreaker” section, as the fiery NWT senator talks about pounding the table in the politics of a bygone era. We also list off the best things to see and do in the North that you've never heard of, with our month-by-month insider's guide. Then, Tim Edwards takes you across the Mackenzie Delta's tundra with Canada's only reindeer herd. Plus: check out the winners, and honourable mentions from our annual photo contest. 

Our final issue of the year highlights the movers and shakers of our region, from a woman preserving her language through social media, to a 28-year-old mayor in Nunavik, culminating with our Northerner of the Year. We’ll also explore a young family homesteading outside Wrigley, NWT, a comic book detailing a futuristic American invasion of Yellowknife, and a collection of Christmas tales from across the North. Check out the back page for a killer Northern four-course holiday feast as well. 

Explore what lies beneath us North of 60. Our November issue features stories on the lost mining town of Pine Point, NWT, a look at the age-old technique of placer mining that's still used in the Yukon today, and a comprehensive report on mining projects up North. Plus: Yukon’s fossil miners, where to find sapphires, jade, and other gemstones in the three territories, and a look at an ancient Arctic city.  

This month, dive into the Northern arts scene, with stories on famous NWT fashion designer D'arcy Moses, a Yellowknife composer using the ice of Great Slave Lake an inspiration for her next opus, fiddling lore of the Arctic, and a failed pottery experimient in Rankin Inlet, Nunavut in the 1960s. Also: get the breakdown on the music, film and literature scene by territory, check out a leaning tower of meat in Fort Providence and thumb your way through some great Northern ghost stories. 

See what it's like to live in all three territorial capitals, or strike it off on your own and discover life in the many small communities dotting the Northwest Territories, Yukon and Nunavut. You'll also learn a couple of important "c-words" in the North: consultation and consensus, courtesy of Tim Edwards and Herb Mathisen. Keep an eye out for a few more Northern political tidbits in this issue too, in light of the upcoming election(s).