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December 2017

You probably figured from the cover: Iqaluit folk-rockers The Jerry Cans, are Up Here's 2017 Northerners of the Year. They’ve launched their own record label, Aakuluk Music, and organized the inaugural Nunavut Music Week. And they’ve got some of the catchiest tunes on the radio. Check out the December issue to hear their story, and why they’re our pick.

There’s a lot to look forward to in this issue: A Greenlandic couple sails the Northwest Passage and finds connections to their home; and we take a look at what it was like to celebrate Christmas on a 19th century Arctic expedition. Plus much, much more.

As always, thanks for reading and happy holidays.

Previous Issues

In our October/November issue the annual Mining Report covers the ups and downs this year in the industry that drives the Northern economy and we look at just what a diamond is really worth. Hint: it involves complicated calculations and bold marketing tactics. Along with mining, this issue is dedicated to art and the artists that represent the North at home, across the country and the world. And we take a trip down the ice road that once was, with an oral history of the Inuvik-Tuktoyaktuk Highway.

Happy reading!

In our education issue, we look at the different ways Northerners learn, and at a few institutions that are bringing students up from the South.

Also in this issue, Dwayne Wohlgemuth takes us on a hike from Kugluktuk, Nunavut to Paulatuk, Northwest Territories and we take a trip to the floe edge in Pond Inlet, to hear about a critical Arctic ecosystem that Inuit are looking to protect.

Happy fall everyone and happy reading.

As Canada rings in its 150th birthday, we look back at some major turning points that have changed the North—and its relationship with Canada—over the last 150 years. It’s a story of colonization, of imposed institutions, of resilient people.

Also, we profile seven entrepreneurs across the three territories creating in-demand products inspired by the land and waters around them. And we get a peek inside the clay-covered creative world of Yellowknife’s Guild of Arts and Crafts.

The midnight sun takes over the June issue of Up Here magazine, and the land and waters we write about.

We’ve got solstice celebrations and a look at just what 24 hours of sunlight does to people, plants and animals.

We also travel out to Marble Island, near Rankin Inlet, where a legendary curse lives up to its hype. And from the photography department, we bring you a feature from inside a taxidermist’s shop in Yellowknife.

 

 

For all those planning Northern treks, our May issue features a rundown on all kinds of hikes. From afternoon trips to overnight adventures, near or far from the city—this should give you an idea of what the northern trails have to offer.

We take a look at the way the North is portrayed in the South, and get a tour of a Northern garden in all four seasons.

In the land, on the water and in the air, people, animals and goods make their way across the vast Canadian North. In the April issue, we look at road building and why some communities are happy to stay disconnected. We talk to a sealift crew member with marine transportation in his blood. And we look at a few species whose migrations are more impressive feats than necessary movements. We also look at the history and continued use of the amauti—the traditional baby-carrying jacket worn by Inuit women—and at the radically changed landscape of the North that harkens back thousands of years to when the Laurentide Ice Sheet first retreated.

The March issue travels across the Canadian Archipelago to share stories of the places that give the country its "True North" cred, but also beg the question, are we doing right by our Arctic?

We also look at Aklavik, NWT, where a federal government plan to relocate the community has only fostered a sense of resistence, and a slogan of "Never Say Die."

In pictures, a feature on heli-skiing captures the St. Elias Mountains and the thrill-seekers that ride them.

 

For our first issue of 2017, we check out territorial and national parks that you probably haven’t heard of, let alone visited, and figured out why you probably should. Contributor Anna Tupakka takes us up the Thelon River, and we get a good look at the four-legged leaders of the North’s iconic dog teams. This issue is about travel in the North, from rugged adventure to glamping (or as close as you can get in the North).

Up Here December 2016

Every year we choose a figure—an individual, a group and one time a whole family—that has left their mark on the North. Whether you know Gary Bailie’s name or not, once you hear his story, you’ll understand why we chose him as the 2016 Northerner of the Year.

Over in Nunavut, we talk to the guys who traverse the roadless landscape on Bombardiers to transport goods to communities, and we head to Fort Providence to get schooled in table tennis.

And, to wrap up a year of Icebreakers—politicians and innovators—we catch up with former premier of the Northwest Territories Nellie Cournoyea, to talk about change, progress and retiring as chair of the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation after 20 years.