UpHere Logo

Magazine

Latest Issues

January/February 2019

New year, new adventures—that's what was on our minds as we put together the January/February travel issue. This issue showcases some of our most breathtaking landscapes that will no doubt inspire your own adventures. Also, this issue includes a profile of the curling stars of the Koe family and a month-by-month guide to unique events across the North in 2019.

Previous Issues

Our December issue delves into a changing North—from Tuktoyaktuk’s shoreline slowly falling into the ocean to warming Northern air and its effect on weather patterns across the country. And we take a look at the Greenland shark, a species that can live for more than 200 years. If sharks could talk, what would they tell us about the changes they’ve seen.

We also showcase our 2018 Northerners of the Year, the Yellowknife Women’s Society. Read about this group of tireless advocates that has spent 30 years listening to women and getting things done.

In case the cover doesn't make it clear enough, this is our arts issue and we catch up with musicians and performers from across the North and ponder one big question: how is it that Nunavut still doesn't have a theatre?

But this double-issue isn't only about the arts. We put a spotlight on wildlife and check in with new technology that allows Nunavummiut to indulge in a class country food dish, without fear of bacteria contimating their meat. And we travel to remote Coats Island with its perfect conditions for research due to a lack of certain predators and permanent human settlements.

In our September issue we look at food grown, foraged and hunted across the North and we search for the meaning of a Northern cuisine. We follow a Dawson City filmmaker who spent a year eating local and we find out what to do with all the berries that crop up in Northern backyards.

We also talk to the biographer of a legendary RCMP officer, trapper and sailor in the North and to a Northwest Passage guru who guides ships from the comforts of his basement. And we’ve got a few more book reviews to fill out your fall reading list.

It's our summer issue, so we head out to cabin country to see what these eclectic and cozy getaways look like in the North. And we also bring you a guide to Northern homes—buildings can look a little different up here and we explain why.

New technology is allowing scientists to take stock of the different animals that use lakes and rivers, requiring only a water sample. This could have major impacts on our understanding of ecosystems and how they're changing, so we take a feature look at this technology, how it's being deployed and how Northerners are involved. We also talk to a few people that have some of the worst summer jobs around, and yet, seem to love them.

Ever wondered how healthcare works in a place where airplanes replace ambulances? In our April/May issue we talk to the people who make sure Northerners—coming from cities connected by highways and communities only reachable by air and water—get the care they need. Spoiler alert: it's not easy.

We also talk to Yellowknife cartoonist and author Alison McCreesh about her latest project, a series of postcards she illustrated on a trip around the Circumpolar North. It turns out, parts of Russia and Greenland have a lot in common with the Canadian North. And in the Yukon, we follow a new paddling trend: boats that fit in a backpack.

There's a lot more inside, so don't miss this issue.

Cryogenic frogs! The man with nine lives! The alien invasion afoot in the Arctic! Our March issue includes the Northern Enquirer, with all the news that's strange but true. Look for it on newsstands or in your mailbox next week.
Also in this issue, we take a look at the legacy of the Arctic Winter Games and the Top of the World Ski Races in Inuvik. And we give you a glimpse of the North through the lenses of our readers with the winners of our annual Up Here Photo Contest.

We're ringing in the new year with our annual travel issue.

Learn everything you need to know before taking a trip to the North—from those who live here. From an insider's guide to pan-territorial travel, to an upclose look at the North's newest roadtrip—Dawson City, Yukon to Tuktoyaktuk, NWT—this is the authentic Northern travel guide.

Also in this issue, we land on a remote island in the Arctic Archipelago to learn how the story of the Franklin Expedition is being unravelled by Inuit historians and underwater archaeologists. And we get a first-hand account of paddling from Yellowknife to Baker Lake, Nunavut, and find out that misadventure isn't the only way to get a good story out of a trip.

Happy New Year, and happy reading!

You probably figured from the cover: Iqaluit folk-rockers The Jerry Cans, are Up Here's 2017 Northerners of the Year. They’ve launched their own record label, Aakuluk Music, and organized the inaugural Nunavut Music Week. And they’ve got some of the catchiest tunes on the radio. Check out the December issue to hear their story, and why they’re our pick.

There’s a lot to look forward to in this issue: A Greenlandic couple sails the Northwest Passage and finds connections to their home; and we take a look at what it was like to celebrate Christmas on a 19th century Arctic expedition. Plus much, much more.

As always, thanks for reading and happy holidays.

In our October/November issue the annual Mining Report covers the ups and downs this year in the industry that drives the Northern economy and we look at just what a diamond is really worth. Hint: it involves complicated calculations and bold marketing tactics. Along with mining, this issue is dedicated to art and the artists that represent the North at home, across the country and the world. And we take a trip down the ice road that once was, with an oral history of the Inuvik-Tuktoyaktuk Highway.

Happy reading!