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NOVEMBER 2019

In this special arts issue, we explore the social fabric of northern knitting, examine southern Canada's history of claiming northern art for its own national identity, and profile some of the rising artistic stars across the territories. 

In This Issue

COURTESY KEGEDONCE PRESS

Rising Like A Flower

Tunchai Redvers takes her cues from the fireweed in her first book of poetry

By Jessica Davey-Quantick
Nov 11
2019
“Wnoondwaamin | we hear them,” on display in Toronto in 2016. Courtesy Frei Njootli/Toni Hafkensheid

All That Echoes

Jeneen Frei Njootli wants you to hear how loud an antler can be.

By Jacob Boon
Nov 08
2019
COURTESY Lianne Marie Leda Charlie/MICHAEL THESSEL

Hot Pink Politics

Lianne Marie Leda Charlie is on an artistic mission of collage and colour.

By Jacob Boon
Nov 06
2019
A quilt created by a communal effort, hosted by the Native Women's Association, in honour of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, was the centrepiece of last year's Social Fabric show. COURTESY YK ARTIST-RUN COMMUNITY CENTRE

Social Fabric

This isn't your grandma's knitting. In the North, artists are making a statement with needle and thread.

By Jessica Davey-Quantick
Nov 04
2019
Ken Thomas, Crystal Carvill, and Sandra Storey install Suzanne Paleczny's piece, “Man Was a Fish, 2017,” during an exhibition at Art House Carcross. Courtesy of Yukon Arts Centre/Mike Thomas

We The Actual North

Northern art is used to define Canada around the globe. But are Northerners getting the recognition and support they deserve at home?

By Jessica Davey-Quantick
Nov 01
2019